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Equality Scheme and Objectives

Stisted C of E Primary Academy


 

Equalities Scheme and Objectives 2016-19

Reviewed : Summer 2016                                    Published : Autumn 2016

 

 

The Public Sector Equality Duty 2011 has three aims under the general duty for schools, academies and settings:

 

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act. By removing or minimising disadvantages suffered by people due to their protected characteristics.
  • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. By taking steps to meet the needs of people from protected groups where these are different from the needs of other people
  • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. By encouraging people from protected groups to participate in public life or in other activities where their participation is disproportionately low.

 

Our school has considered how well we currently achieve these aims with regard to the eight protected equality groups : race/disability/sex/gender reassignment/age/pregnancy and maternity/religion and belief/sexual orientation

 

In compiling this equality information we have :

 

  • Identified evidence already in the school of equality within policies and practice and identified and gaps.

 

  • Set objectives for the next three years

 

 

Key Points

 

The Equality Act 2010 replaces previous anti-discrimination laws with a single act to make the law simpler and to remove inconsistencies. This makes the law easier for people to understand and comply with. The act also strengthened protection in some situations.

The act covers nine protected characteristics, which cannot be used as a reason to treat people unfairly. Every person has one or more of the protected characteristics, so the act protects everyone against unfair treatment.

It is unlawful for a school to victimise, harass or discriminate against a pupil, prospective pupil, parent or member of staff by treating them less favourably because of their :

 

 

  • sex,
  • race,
  • disability,
  • religion or belief
  • sexual orientation
  • gender reassignment,
  • pregnancy or maternity

 

 

Direct discrimination occurs when one person treats another less favourably than they treat – or would treat – other people with the same protected characteristic. This describes the most clear-cut and obvious examples of discrimination – for example if a school were to refuse to let a pupil be a prefect because she is pregnant would be unlawful.

 

Indirect discrimination occurs when a “provision, criterion or practice” is applied generally but has the effect of putting people with a particular characteristic at a disadvantage when compared to people without that characteristic.

 

An example might be holding a parents’ meeting on a Friday evening, which could make it difficult for observant Jewish parents to attend. It is a defence against a claim of indirect discrimination if it can be shown to be “a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim”. This means both that the reason for the rule or practice is legitimate, and that it could not reasonably be achieved in a different way which did not discriminate.

 

Harassment has a specific legal definition in the Act - it is “unwanted conduct, related to a relevant protected characteristic, which has the purpose or effect of violating a person’s dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for that person”.

 

This covers unpleasant and bullying behaviour, but potentially extends also to actions which, whether intentionally or unintentionally, cause offence to a person because of a protected characteristic.

 

Victimisation occurs when a person is treated less favourably than they otherwise would have been because of something they have done (“a protected act”) in connection with the act.  A protected act might involve, for example, making an allegation of discrimination or bringing a case under the Act.

 

      The specific duties regulations require schools:

 

  1. to publish information to demonstrate how they are complying with the Public Sector Equality Duty, and
  2.  to prepare and publish equality objectives.

 

Schools  need to update the published information at least annually and to publish objectives at least once every four years.

 

Data about employees will not need to be published where a public authority has fewer than 150 employees. 

 

This means that for the great majority of schools, only pupil-related data will need to be published.

 

     Specific duties

 

The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) Regulations 2011 came into force on 10 September 2011.

The specific duties help public bodies perform the Equality Duty better. They do this by requiring public bodies to be transparent about how they are responding to the Equality Duty – requiring them to publish relevant, proportionate information showing compliance with the Equality Duty, and to set equality objectives. 

 

      Equal Opportunities

 

       The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) requires public bodies to be transparent about how they are responding

       to the Equality Duty including publishing relevant, proportionate information showing compliance with the

       Equality Duty, and at least one equality objective.

 

       The Public Sector Equality Duty 2011 has three aims under the general duty for schools, academies and setting.

       

       These are to :

 

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act. By removing or minimising disadvantages suffered by people due to their protected characteristics.
  • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. By taking steps to meet the needs of people from protected groups where these are different from the needs of other people
  • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. By encouraging people from protected groups to participate in public life or in other activities where their participation is disproportionately low.

 

Our school considers how well we achieve these aims and publishes this in an Equality Scheme and Objectives.

 

The audit, evaluation objectives set by the Academy are set out in the link below:

 

 

 

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