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Our Curriculum

Our Curriculum

 

At Stisted Primary Academy we believe that your child's learning should be a purposeful, rewarding and enjoyable experience.

 

This means that through an engaging and relevant curriculum, we aim to equip your child with the skills, knowledge, understanding and attitudes necessary to make informed choices and lead happy and rewarding lives. 

 

We base our curriculum on the National Curriculum and organise it into topics or themes that engage and interest our children. 

 

We have designed out curriculum to achieve the following aims :

 

 

1. To improve children's life opportunities and help them lead happy and rewarding lives;

 

2. To instil positive attitudes towards learning enabling children to become a lifelong learners;

 

3. To enable children to become a confident, resourceful, responsible enquiring and independent  learners;

 

4. To foster children’s self-esteem and help them build positive relationships with other people;

 

5. To develop children’s self-respect and encourage them to respect the ideas, attitudes, values and feelings of others;

 

6. To show respect for all cultures, the rule of law, democracy and, in so doing, to promote positive attitudes towards other people;

 

7. To enable children to understand their community and help them feel valued as part of this community;

 

8. To help children grow into reliable, law abiding independent, and positive citizens;

 

9. To provide children with opportunities for spiritual, moral and cultural development.

 

 

The National Curriculum

 

The National Curriculum sets out a clear, full and statutory entitlement to learning for all pupils in maintained schools. It determines the content of what will be taught, and sets attainment targets for learning. It also determines how performance will be assessed and reported.  It is organised into Key Stages. This means our Reception children are in the final year of the Early Years Foundation Stage. School Curriculum includes all learning and other experiences that the school plans for our pupils. The National Curriculum forms only one part of the School Curriculum.

 

Our School Curriculum comprises of the School Curriculum and the National curriculum.

 

The National Curriculum sets out a clear, full and statutory entitlement to learning for all pupils in maintained schools. As an academy, we have chosen to adopt the National Curriculum as it sets out the body of knowledge and skills children are expected to achieve.

 

 

The Curriculum at Stisted

 

The main subjects we teach are English, Mathematics and Numeracy, Science, Computer Skills and Computing, Geography, History, Art, Design and Technology, Physical Education, French, Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship and Religious Education. We also teach Practical Life Skills.

 

Embedded within the curriculum are opportunities to develop children's spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.

 

Our curiculum is organised into two yearly cycles - Cycle A and Cycle B. This avoids children repeating a topic or knowledge based content two years in a row because of the way we organise mixed year group classes. This is where a child will remain in the same class but different year group for up to two years in a row.

 

The subject content for each cycle is outlined in the down loadable documents at the foot of this page. 

 

Reading

 

We use Letters and Sounds as our formal reading scheme. Children are taught the sounds letters make and how to synthesise and segment these sounds to read and de-construct words. They are also taught to read by sight, high frequency words.

 

This is achieved by daily whole class phonics sessions in which these skills, sight words and letters and sounds are taught up to three times a day. This process continues until the end of Key Stage 1.

 

Where there is a need, pupils in Key Stage 2 have access to this approach if they are not yet fluent readers. Reading is further developed and embedded into the curriculum through carefully sequenced and planned activities.

 

At Key Stage 2, greater emphasis is placed on developing children’s understanding and comprehension of more complex text types and genres.  There is particular emphasis on developing children’s ability to interpret meaning beyond the literal. This too is achieved by embedding carefully sequenced and planned activities into the curriculum and using high quality texts.

 

Writing

 

Children begin the writing process by engaging in activities that develop left to right tracking, gross and fine motor movement including developing a controlled pincer grip.

 

The order and sequence children learn to form letters is the same as the sequence we teach the initial phonemes in our reading scheme.

 

Once a child is competent at orally blending and segmenting simple words, the following letters are introduced : satpinmd.

At this stage children are not expected to write these with a pencil but to recognise the sound each makes. Next the children are introduced to our Large Moveable Alphabet. These are wooden letters the child can touch hold and move.

 

Once they know the sound each letter makes that they are initially introduced to, they can begin to build their first words using the wooden letters. For example pin tin tap map.

 

Children progress to mark making and pattern making using various media until they have the fine motor control to write these letters. Initially this may be in sand before moving onto paper.

 

The first steps in writing involve writing single letters to represent a sound then  simple consonant vowel words by labelling picture cards.

 

The children then progress to constructing simple article, adjective noun phrases such as the red hen, the big box, the hot sun before moving onto simple sentences such as : The hen is on the box.

 

As children progress throughout the school they are introduced to different forms of writing. They examine model texts and identify the key features of each. Initially they imitate model texts before innovating and writing their own.

 

 

Religious Education

 

The Religious Education Curriculum gives  emphasis and balance to teaching pupils about the Old and New Testaments’ the main festivals in the Christian calendar, and other religions i.e. Judaism and Hinduism.   This helps your child to understand religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Hinduism and to recognise the cultural influences of religion in the forming of patterns of social behaviour and community cohesion.

 

 

Number and mathematics

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in Key Stage 1 (infants) is to ensure that pupils develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value. This will involve working with numerals, words and the four operations, including with practical resources [for example, concrete objects and measuring tools].

 

At this stage, pupils will develop their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary. Teaching should also involve using a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money. By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value. An emphasis on practice at this early stage will aid fluency. Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary, at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

 

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in Key Stage 2 (juniors) is to ensure that pupils extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include larger integers. This will develop the connections that pupils make between multiplication and division with fractions, decimals, percentages and ratio.

 

At this stage, pupils will develop their ability to solve a wider range of problems, including increasingly complex properties of numbers and arithmetic, and problems demanding efficient written and mental methods of calculation. With this foundation in arithmetic, pupils are introduced to the language of algebra as a means for solving a variety of problems. Teaching in geometry and measures should consolidate and extend knowledge developed in number.

 

Teaching aims to ensure that pupils classify shapes with increasingly complex geometric properties and that they learn the vocabulary they need to describe them. By the end of year 6, pupils should be fluent in written methods for all four operations, including long multiplication and division, and in working with fractions, decimals and percentages.

 

Science

 

The principal focus of science teaching in Key Stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They will be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice.

 

They will be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information.

 

They will begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. ‘

 

The principal focus of science teaching in Key Stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They will do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically.

 

At Key Stage 2, they will encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They will also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They will select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils will  draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings.

 

Art

 

At Key stage 1, pupils will be taught:

 

·         to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products

·         to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination

·         to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form

            and space

·         about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and

            similarities between different

            practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

 

  At Key stage 2, pupils will be taught :

 

·         to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity,

            experimentation and an              

            increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

·         to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas

·         to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with

            a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]

·         about great artists, architects and designers in history

 

 

Computing

 

Computers play a central role in our modern world. We believe it is important that your child develops these skills and becomes 'computer' literate. All our computers are networked with broadband internet access. Our internet connection has fully installed internet filters.

 

Laptop computers are also networked via a wireless connection and are equipped with the latest software to deliver the computing curriculum and internet security. All pupils have access to their own computer during lessons. All classrooms are fully equipped with an interactive Smartboard, projector, DVD/video/CD player and sound system.

 

At Key stage 1, pupils should be taught to:

 

·         understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that

            programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions

·         create and debug simple programs

·         use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

·         use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

·         recognise common uses of information technology beyond school

·         use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for

            help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online

            technologies.

 

At Key Stage 2 Pupils are taught to : 

             

·         design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating

            physical systems; solve

            problems by decomposing them into smaller parts

·         use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input

            and output

·         use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in

            algorithms and programs

·         understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as

             the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration

·         use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning

            in evaluating digital content

·         select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices

            to design and create a

            range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing,

            evaluating and presenting data and information

·         use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour;

            identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

 

 

Design and Technology

 

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils will be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They will work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment]. When designing and making, pupils will be taught to:

 

Key stage 1

 

Design

 

·         design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design

            criteria

·         generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups

            and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

 

Make

·         select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting,

            shaping, joining and finishing]

·         select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials,

            textiles and ingredients,

            according to their characteristics

 

Evaluate

·         explore and evaluate a range of existing products

·         evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria Technical knowledge

·         build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

·         explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

 

 Key stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils will be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making.

They will work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment].

 

When designing and making, pupils will be taught to:

 

Design

·         use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing

            products that are fit for

            purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups

·         generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-

            sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

 

Make

·         select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example,

            cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately

·         select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials,

             textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

 

Evaluate

·         investigate and analyse a range of existing products

·         evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to

            improve their work

·         understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

 

Technical knowledge

·         apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures

·         understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and             linkages]

·         understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating

            switches, bulbs, buzzers and

            motors]

·         apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

 

Cooking and nutrition

As part of their work with food, pupils will  be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity.

 

Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

 

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes

·         understand where food comes from

·         understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet

·         prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques

·         understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught

            and processed

 

Geography

Key Stage 1

 

Pupils will develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They should understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness.

 

Locational knowledge

 

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans

·         name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom

            and its surrounding seas

 

Place knowledge

·         understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical

            geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European

            country

 

Human and physical geography

·         identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold

            areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles

·         use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

·         key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley,

            vegetation, season and weather

·         key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

·         use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the

            countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage

·         use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language

            [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map

·         use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical                   features; devise a simple

            map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key

·         use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds

            and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

 

Key Stage 2

Pupils will extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They will develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge.

 

Locational knowledge

·         locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and

            North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human

            characteristics, countries, and major cities

·         name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying

            human and physical

            characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use

            patterns; and

            understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

·         identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern

            Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich

            Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

 

Place knowledge

·         understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical

            geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within                       North or South America Humanand physical geography

· 

 

Physical geography

·                describe and understand key aspects of: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers,

                    mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle

 

Human geography

·         types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of    

            natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

·         use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features

            studied

·         use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the

            use of Ordnance Survey

            maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world Geography

·         use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local

            area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

 

Key stage 1

 

Pupils will develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They will learn where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They will use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms and be taught to ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events.

 

They will understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

 

Pupils will be taught about:

 

·         changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in

            national life

·         events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of

             London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries]

·         the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international

            achievements [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong,             William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel

            the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and                 Edith Cavell]

·         significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

 

Key stage 2

Pupils will continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They will learn to note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They will regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

 

They will construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. 

 

They will be taught to understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

 

Pupils should be taught about:

 

·         changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age Examples (non-statutory)

 

This may include:

 

1.      late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers, for example, Skara Brae

2.      Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for example, Stonehenge

3.      Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

 

·         the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain Examples (non-statutory) This may  include:

 

1.       Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC

2.      the Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its army

3.      successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall

4.      British resistance, for example, Boudica

5.      ‘Romanisation’ of Britain: sites such as Caerwent and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs, including early Christianity

 

·         Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots Examples (non-statutory) This may  include:

 

1.      Roman withdrawal from Britain in c. AD 410 and the fall of the western Roman Empire

2.      Scots invasions from Ireland to north Britain (now Scotland)

3.      Anglo-Saxon invasions, settlements and kingdoms: place names and village life

4.      Anglo-Saxon art and culture

5.      Christian conversion – Canterbury, Iona and Lindisfarne

 

·          the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor Examples (non-statutory) This may include:

 

1.      Viking raids and invasion

2.      resistance by Alfred the Great and Athelstan, first king of England

3.      further Viking invasions and Danegeld

4.       Anglo-Saxon laws and justice

5.       Edward the Confessor and his death in 1066

 

·       a local history study Examples (non-statutory)This may include :

 

1.      a depth study linked to one of the British areas of study listed above

2.      a study over time tracing how several aspects of national history are reflected in the locality (this can go

          beyond 1066)

3.      a study of an aspect of history or a site dating from a period beyond 1066 that is significant in the

          locality.

 

·         a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond

            1066 Examples (non-statutory). This may include :

 

1.      the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria

2.      changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the

         present or leisure and

         entertainment in the 20th Century

3.      the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history,

         including the present day

4.      a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain

 

·         the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations

            appeared and a depth

            study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of

            Ancient China

 

·         Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world

·         a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early

            Islamic civilization, including

            a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

 

French

 

All children from Year 1 upwards have the opportunity to learn a Modern Foreign Language. French is initially taught through role play, games, songs and music.

 

Children will soon develop the confidence to ask and answer simple questions in French and learn about French and European culture.

 

 

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding

·         explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound

            and meaning of words

·         engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and

            help

·         speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures

·         develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud

            or using familiar words and phrases

·         present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences*

·         read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing

·         appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the language

·         broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into

            familiar written material,

            including through using a dictionary

·         write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly

·         describe people, places, things and actions orally* and in writing Languages

·         understand basic grammar appropriate to the language being studied, including (where relevant):

            feminine, masculine and neuter forms and the conjugation of high-frequency verbs; key features and  

            patterns of the language; how to apply these, for instance, to build sentences; and how these differ

            from or are similar to English.

 

Music

Key stage 1

 

Pupils will learn to:

 

·         use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes

·         play tuned and untuned instruments musically

·         listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music

·         experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

 

Key stage 2

 

Pupils will learn to sing and play musically with increasing confidence and control. They will be taught to develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from aural memory.

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments

            with increasing accuracy,

            fluency, control and expression

·         improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music

·         listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory

·         use and understand staff and other musical notations

·         appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different

            traditions and from

            great composers and musicians

·         develop an understanding of the history of music.

 

Physical Education

 

We believe Physical Education is a vital part of developing both fitness, health and coordination.

 

Key stage 1

 

Pupils will be taught to develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others.

They will be taught to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.

 

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing

            balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities

·         participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending

·         perform dances using simple movement patterns.

 

 

Key stage 2

 

Pupils will be taught to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They will be taught to develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

 

Pupils will be taught to:

 

·         use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination

·         play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket,

            football, hockey, netball,rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and

            defending

·         develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and

             gymnastics]

·         perform dances using a range of movement patterns

·          take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team

·         compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their

            personal best. 

 

 

Multi-Cultural Education

 

We believe it is important that your child learns and understands that we live in a diverse society. We incorporate this into our termly topics and the Personal, Social Health, Education and Citizenship elements of the curriculum. 

 

Throughout the year, we recognise key dates such as the Chinese New Year and religious festivals. We celebrate diversity which includes an appreciation of music, beliefs, art and food from different parts of the world.  Planned activities help your child develop the concept of their place in the world and that all people should be valued.

 

 

School Residential

 

In Year 5 and Year 6, your child will have the opportunity to go to the Isle of Wight for a week during September.

 

We also take your child camping at Danbury Outdoor Pursuits Centre where they get the chance to experience high ropes, kayaking, archery and problem solving.

 

We believe these experience will further develop your child's resilience, independence, thinking skills, physical development and life skills such as communication, teamwork and social skills.

 

Early Years Outdoor Play Area

 

In Autumn 2010, our Early Years Outdoor Play Area was completed. Our outdoor play area helps our younger learners develop their physical skills as well as given them an opportunity to learn through play. The Early Years outdoor play area also offers our younger learners a secure place to play at break times.

 

Outdoor learning

 

Whenever possible, we try and make best use of our outdoor environment to enhance learning. Stisted and its surrounding area offers your child a wealth of opportunities within walking distance. These opportunities include our historic church and the magnificent ‘Bluebell’ wood.

 

Homework

There are many different perceptions of what homework should look like. We believe homework is an extension of the partnership between home and school and is encouraged in a positive way.  The essence of work at home should be to encourage personal motivational skills, practical everyday tasks, research and investigation with the emphasis on learning from first hand experience.

 

We expect children to read at home with an adult every day. This should be recorded in your child’s Home-School book.

 

More formal homework is set as your child moves through the school

 

We also hope that you will offer your child opportunities to access the outside world and the wide environment by visiting museums, galleries, nature reserves, historic and geographic sites, concerts, shows and other places of interest. We hope that your children will enjoy learning in the home, i.e. cooking, gardening, care of pets, simple DIY tasks.

 

Teaching Approaches

 

At Stisted  Primary Academy we believe in the importance of making cross-curricular links to make learning more enjoyable, relevant and purposeful.

 

This means, where possible, organising the curriculum through themes or topics that we believe interest the children.

 

Although there are many separate National Curriculum subjects, we tend to blend them together into meaningful topics and themes that engage the primary aged learner.

 

 

There are generally 5 approaches used at Stisted. These are:

 

1.Subject/skill based lessons e.g. a Maths lesson on adding two numbers together or a Geography lesson on how to read a map.

 

2. Cross curricular topics, themes or projects. e.g. Dinosaur Isle

 

3. Imaginative enquiry through fictional commissions or drama for learning e.g. Let's imagine we have been asked to design a hat for the Mad Hatter's Tea Party

 

4. Project enquires e.g. Who killed Tutankhamun?

 

5. Real commissions. e.g. Let's organise a tea party and entertainment for the Over 60s Club

                                                                  

Imaginative Enquiry

 

At Stisted Primary Academy, we use ‘imaginative enquiry’ to deliver part of our curriculum. We believe that this makes learning more meaningful and enjoyable. The use of ‘drama for learning’ as opposed to theatre drama is the vehicle we use to engage children in an ‘imaginative enquiry’.

 

 

We recognise that ‘imaginative enquiry’ may not meet all your child's curricular needs and we use it selectively alongside other approaches including subject teaching and topic teaching.

 

‘Imaginative enquiry’  invents a reason for every task a child is asked to do using drama and role play. It is a system where children learn by solving problems and engaging in tasks as if they are experts operating in the real world.

 

‘Imaginative enquiry’ requires children to enter into role play and imagine and think as if there were an expert or specialist e.g wallpaper designers inventing a new wallpaper design for the 2012 Olympics or specialist milliners commissioned to design a new hat for the Queen of Hearts for the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party. The teacher is also cast in role often as a colleague or supervisor  alongside the children. 

 

 

‘Imaginative enquiry’  is truly a cross curricular approach to learning. It can’t be defined or even timetabled in terms of subject headings. The curriculum is viewed holistically rather than as individual subjects. All work is task led because in the real world we function on a day to day basis by completing tasks without the need to compartmentalise them into subjects. By providing children with real purposeful tasks the boundaries between subjects become blurred.

 

The Problem Solving approach

 

Where possible, our teaching approach places problem solving at its centre. This is a particularly effective approach for our most able learners.

 

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)

 

We cater for a wide range of children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. Early identification is critical in supporting children who have specific learning needs. Children with special needs may have an Individual Education Plan that identifies specific support. This could be delivered by a teacher, Learning Support Assistant or a specialist Learning Support Assistant.

We also have an enhanced provision classroom to support our learners based on the principles that underpin Montessori education.  It is a constructivist or "discovery" model for learning where children learn concepts from working with materials and interacting with their environment rather than by direct instruction.

 

We have adopted this approach to enhance and compliment current classroom based provision. It is particularly suited to meet the needs of learners where conventional classroom based learning is less appropriate for meeting a child’s needs.

 

Children are identified who are likely to benefit from a Montessori education for part of the week.

 

The Montessori Environment is a mixed age classroom designed to meet the needs of learners that need an alternative approach for part of the week.  It particular suits those children with special educational needs.

 

Further information on Special Needs can be found in our Guide for Parents SEN leaflet or the the Special Educational Needs Information Report under the tab SEN.

 

Alternatively, you may pick up copy from the school foyer.

 

You can also access further information and provision in the local area using the following link :

 

http://www.essexlocaloffer.org.uk/

The Curriculum for Religious Education Key Stage 1 and 2 and Early Years

The National Curriculum

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